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Hoosierfunguy

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Everything posted by Hoosierfunguy

  1. I know we should be in that season here, so the hunt for the elusive Frondosa commences. I enjoy learning about other's successes also!
  2. Hoosierfunguy

    Chicken of the woods

    I tried freezing them raw and also par boiling them, then freezing and partially cooking them in oil, then freezing. None of those worked well. The texture and flavor was compromised.
  3. Hoosierfunguy

    Chicken of the woods

  4. Hoosierfunguy

    Chicken of the woods

    That reminded me of some chickens I harvested a few years ago
  5. Hoosierfunguy

    in my backyard

    It does have some likeness to it and it's possible that it's not matured yet. What does it look like now?
  6. Hoosierfunguy

    Honey Mushroom

    At what stage do you decide that a honey mushroom is too far gone to harvest and eat? I've found that less than 10% of them in my area haven't been invaded by larva within the first day of them surfacing. I've only cooked the ones that hadn't been obviously eaten and the flavors were not as pleasant as I've heard many others speak of. I wonder if people are actually enjoying the flavor of the worms, thinking it's the mushroom 🤷‍♂️
  7. Hoosierfunguy

    Chantrelle

    Judging from the size of the stalks, and caps, next to the ground ivy, those are too small and grayish to be honeys.
  8. Hoosierfunguy

    Chantrelle

    Those are not chanterelles
  9. Hoosierfunguy

    Hericium

    Way cool!
  10. Hoosierfunguy

    What is this???

    Laetiporus Cincinnatus Chicken of the woods. When the rosette structure matures, I slice the shelves of while they are tender and young and saute them. 🙂
  11. Hoosierfunguy

    Whitewater and Mounds

    I'm interested in the answer
  12. Hoosierfunguy

    Chanterelle I.D.

    The whiter looking one appears to be an older, more weathered and sun-bleached chanterelle. If you're looking to make positive IDs for consumption, Bruce has posted some excellent resources on prior "ID help" threads. I wouldn't eat an older one and even the younger Chants, I cast off the ones that have multiple worm holes visible in the stalk (when sliced). Chanterelle mushrooms are a choice edible and delicious! You should only eat mushrooms that you are 100% positive ID their identification and even then, use caution ⚠️
  13. Hoosierfunguy

    Chanterelle I.D.

    One of the easiest ways to differentiate Jacks from Chants is the flesh of the Chanterelle is white, while the flesh of the Jacks is yellowish orange. And of course, Chanterelles don't glow in the dark...lol
  14. Hoosierfunguy

    Chants everywhere

    I haven't gone out much but one day in the woods I did harvest a lot of them in a short amount of time because they are so abundant.
  15. Hoosierfunguy

    Help Identify

    What Bruce said. Early in my mushroom identifying days, I falsely Identified a Green Spore Lepiota as a Parasol. I was sick for 2 days and wished it was a lethal one that would just get it over with because it was so extremely painful. It's also called "The Vomiter" 🤷‍♂️ If you don't have a glass slide for the spores to drop on, a spore print is good to take on a split surface, like half black paper, half white paper to see the color.
  16. Hoosierfunguy

    First Find

    Congratulations on your first find 9f the highly sought after morel! How many seasons have you searched for them?
  17. Hoosierfunguy

    Morel season 2020

    Surprisingly, I found a fairly good haul of some very fresh large yellows yesterday, under Elm and Cherry trees, showing that the cooler than average temps have extended the season a bit this Spring (at least in Northern Indiana).
  18. I had never seen these before and just this last week I noticed them adorning my juniper trees. They have a tangerine color to the jelly like tentacles that come from the growth on the branches. They're not healthy for the trees, but they look really cool.
  19. Hoosierfunguy

    New mushroom

    I've been finding these around my yard for a couple of seasons. Did you get a positive ID? I just found these ones yesterday
  20. Hoosierfunguy

    Morel season 2020

    We're at the end of the season. I was down there last weekend in Shades State park and went through some prime area and found nothing. Another group of hunters found 6-7 after 5 hours, so it's likely only going to be fairly productive north of Indiana from here on out.
  21. Hoosierfunguy

    New to the group

    Welcome Annette. There are so many ways to learn. The best thing I've found is to get out into the woods and glean from a many as you can as well as read some good books. This forum has a few very knowledgeable people and they have forays every year.
  22. Hoosierfunguy

    Looking for experts

    Welcome Mr. Guy..We're all novices. The smartest of us all doesn't even know 1% of everything there is to know about one mushroom, but we're learning...lol Really cool user name btw. I live in Northwest Indiana. I've never found the mother load of morels, but I have found the Mother Load of many other delectable Micro Rhizome Fungi fruiting bodies.
  23. Hoosierfunguy

    Identify Please

    That's cool. Looks like a false morel. I've never found one before, but have seen a lot of pictures of them. Gyromitra esculenta can be deadly if eaten raw and still toxic if cooked.
  24. Hoosierfunguy

    Chaga??

    Cool. Thanks Chris. I'm curious to know if the properties are the same (or similar) as Chaga found on Birch, Aspen and Poplar, being an immune system booster, with antioxidants and effective at fighting cancer. They were both found on white oak trees, being the second and third fruiting bodies I've found on oaks, all within 100 yards of each other.
  25. Hoosierfunguy

    Chaga??

    Okay, found a couple of these

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