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Sasha Gordon

Edible Native Strains?

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Hello All!

I joined this forum to find out where I could find strains of edible mushrooms that are native to Indiana. I have a lot of soft lumber in my yard that I want to inoculate with mushrooms, but I don't want to just buy something off the internet and have it not take or have it take so well that it becomes invasive. Any assistance or even a link to a site that has more info would be great. 

Thanks in advanced!

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I have not inoculated wood myself (yet), but rumor has it that oysters will grow aggressively. Bore holes 1" deep and 5/16" in diameter every 6" in willow, poplar or cottonwood, poke a small plug of oyster fruiting body in each hole, cover with beeswax, and keep it wet. Be advised that the type of wood matters -- building lumber is mostly spruce or pine and most Indiana species will NOT colonize it (perhaps a good thing). Let me know if you meet with success!

Edited by Bruce
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When I find oysters - and they grow everywhere in Indiana throughout the summer and even into December some years - I will take some of the ones that are too far gone to cook up and simply place them on a downed tulip tree - especially at a split or where bark is ripped. Or the tops of tulip stumps. The white spores can easily be seen under the mushroom placed on the log. It's best to use recently dead tulip - though wait 3 or so months before inoculating in this way. I live south of Indy in the woods, so I have great access. It takes a year or maybe 2 - but generally the following season - before you will see oysters on the tree you inoculated. Regular rains help. You can water it if there is a dry spell and a water source is near. Also helps if the wood is shaded.

 

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The mission of the Hoosier Mushroom Society is to promote the science of mycology and the study of fungi.
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