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dmitch24

Beefsteak/ elephant ear

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My family grew up eating these. It wasn’t until the past year that I found out that they can be poisonous with MMH. My family still eats these along with many other guys I know. I have never heard of anyone getting sick. The only common denominator I can find is no one eats the stem. Does anyone have more knowledge on false morels?

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Many species in this group are known to be poisonous. Our midwestern species have never been tested for levels of potential toxins. Many people have eaten them fine for years with no ill effects, but we suggest to avoid them until there is convincing evidence they do not contain detectable levels of the toxin.

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Some false morels of the genus Gyromitra and Verpa contain gyromitrin, which is hydrolyzed to monomethylhydrazine in the body. Monomethylhydrazine not only displays acute toxicity to the liver and kidneys, but is also carcinogenic.

It boils off at 87C, which is below the boiling point of water. So the folklore with false morels is that if you cook them thoroughly (with the lid off the pan), they are safe. I have no desire to perform such experiments on myself. 

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyromitra_esculenta

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22 hours ago, hoosiermushrooms said:

I would also be interested in a piece of the specimen if possible...to determine the species, not edibility.

I would be happy to send you an entire mushroom. Just let me know what’s the best way to contact/ship 

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10 hours ago, Bruce said:

Some false morels of the genus Gyromitra and Verpa contain gyromitrin, which is hydrolyzed to monomethylhydrazine in the body. Monomethylhydrazine not only displays acute toxicity to the liver and kidneys, but is also carcinogenic.

It boils off at 87C, which is below the boiling point of water. So the folklore with false morels is that if you cook them thoroughly (with the lid off the pan), they are safe. I have no desire to perform such experiments on myself. 

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyromitra_esculenta

Thanks Bruce. That makes sense on the boiling off it is true. It’s a generational ignorance passed down at least from my great grandpa. It wasn’t until doing research on other mushrooms besides morels that I had heard they were toxic.

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