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Found these is west central Indiana growing from ground can anyone tell me if either is a edible type I attached the pictures  he orange ones appeared to be chanterelles but was not sure if there could be lookalikes

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Edited by Benbaker47974
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The orange ones do appear to be chanterelles. The others are some kind of bolete possibly lilac bolete but i am not possitve on this.

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If you are new to mushroom foraging i would suggest a couple good books in identification. Ones i suggest in Edible wild mushrooms of illinois and surrounding states by m. Mueller and joe mcfarland and mushrooms of the midwest michael kuo and andy methven.

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ok Thanks,  and if I’m not mistaken the only dangerous lookalike would be jackolatern which would be growing from wood,,    And after more reading today boletes are safe some could just Make you sick,, but none deadly, 

 

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31 minutes ago, Benbaker47974 said:

ok Thanks,  and if I’m not mistaken the only dangerous lookalike would be jackolatern which would be growing from wood,,    And after more reading today boletes are safe some could just Make you sick,, but none deadly, 

Only the edible boletes are safe.  Positive identification is extremely important.  Although some might not kill you,  you might wish they would,  if you eat the wrong ones. Some effects are endurable, while others are so horrible,  it can be beyond words. That vase shaped mushroom is likely a Chanterelle.  If the flesh inside is white(ish) then I'd cook it and eat it,  but the boletes are not as easily identified. 

 

Dhuntington's advice is good👍🏼

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Those do look like Lilac Boletes to me. http://www.mushroomfarm.com/mushroom-species/boletes/xanthoconium-separans.html

Most boletes that do not have a red pore surface and do not stain blue on bruising are edible. But not all. And "edible" does not necessarily mean "good."

Getting a book or two and studying up is a good idea. There's a lot of good information on the web, but a lot of misinformation, too.

Bruce

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Ok thanks we at the chanterelle and didn’t die..   for the bolete didn’t know soaking in water made it turn to slimey. so I pitched, it thanks

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Apprently this mushroom has gone through a couple of classifications and is back to the boletus family(according to a couple of websites I found). The young ones with the thinner pore surfaces are tastier than the mature ones.  I wanted to note that most choice boletes I find (especially the king) seem to sprout right ontop of beetle colonies 😫 I slice the stem to check for larva tunnels and larva.  Sometimes the stem should be discarded but the cap can be untouched by insects.  Boletes also can be dehydrated either in a dry location or on a dehydrator,  then rehydrated for later use in soups. Cream seems to extract a stronger, richer flavor from dehydrated boletes,  than fresh,  moist ones; so I almost always dehydrate boletes to add to soup. Even though the season for these are nearing the end,  I hope you have the opportunity to harvest some youngins👍🏼

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