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  1. Today
  2. S_Proctor

    Pleurotus confirmation

    I have, prior to posting here and they both have such similar characteristics. I am particularly concerned about positively identifying the one on the stick rather than the stumps. When comparing the Angel's wings to oysters, without the experience of having both side by side to touch, smell, etc...how do you differentiate when the two are so similar?
  3. Yesterday
  4. Dhuntington

    Pleurotus confirmation

    Compare to Pleurotus pulmonarius, summer oyster mushroom.
  5. Dhuntington

    What are these?

    Bolete mushroom possibly in the tylopilus genus
  6. Dhuntington

    Slimy Lil Goobers

    Not sure but it looks like Tremella foliacea
  7. Last week
  8. SywyrdMoon

    Slimy Lil Goobers

    Yep, Title says just about all I know. They were growing out of logs in a mixed hardwood area in Fort Wayne last week. Slimy and wet, gelatinous like a wood ear buuuuut they look like walnuts🤷.... I posted them on a few groups and never got a solid ID. All I know is that they're not wood ears. (I think😂😂😂) Thanks for any Help✨
  9. SywyrdMoon

    What are these?

    I'm new to mycology... So definitely don't do anything based on my opinion But look at Clitocybe Nuda Think this is a wood blewit
  10. I have hunted morels my entire life, but I am a newcomer to chanterelles and oyster mushrooms. We recently acquired property that is mostly populated with tulip poplar, oak, beech, ash, elm and walnut. Cedar is scattered sporadically. I thought I would give summer/fall mushrooming a whirl. I found a couple of small chanterelle patches so far (golden and cinnabar)- and what I think are oyster mushrooms, if someone could help confirm. I don't want to mistake Angel's Wings for Chanterelles. Spore prints precede specimen they belong to. TIA.
  11. Bruce

    What are these?

    On first glance they look like oyster mushrooms, but lacking a photo of the underside there is no way to be sure. Bruce
  12. Hoosierfunguy

    Chanterelle I.D.

    The whiter looking one appears to be an older, more weathered and sun-bleached chanterelle. If you're looking to make positive IDs for consumption, Bruce has posted some excellent resources on prior "ID help" threads. I wouldn't eat an older one and even the younger Chants, I cast off the ones that have multiple worm holes visible in the stalk (when sliced). Chanterelle mushrooms are a choice edible and delicious! You should only eat mushrooms that you are 100% positive ID their identification and even then, use caution ⚠️
  13. jungleboy

    What are these?

    I live in Elkhart, and was out for a jog after one of the recent rains, and found this log just covered with these. They were about the size of my hand. Unfortunately I didn't think to flip them over to take a pic of the underside. Any idea what they are?
  14. Julianne Graper

    Chanterelle I.D.

    I also had this question. I'm new to this area and found both of these while hiking today and am not sure if they're both chanterelles, or if the lighter one with the longer stalk might be different. Thanks!
  15. Hoosierfunguy

    Chanterelle I.D.

    One of the easiest ways to differentiate Jacks from Chants is the flesh of the Chanterelle is white, while the flesh of the Jacks is yellowish orange. And of course, Chanterelles don't glow in the dark...lol
  16. Diana Moran

    Chanterelle I.D.

    So the Jacks are more rounded and have gills correct?
  17. dmitch24

    Chants everywhere

    Nice Bruce! Buddy and I came away with ten pounds today up in northeast Indiana today in one small woods. This is this first year we have found this many. Any suggestions on preserving? I’ve seen a lot of suggestions online just looking for real word advice. Thanks
  18. dmitch24

    Chanterelle I.D.

    Those are chanterelles. The only look alike is jacks. I’ll share a couple pics of the jacks.
  19. Evan McDivitt

    Chanterelle I.D.

    There are a lot of these orange fungi popping up and I think they are chanterelles but cannot be sure. Is there anything else these could be from the picture?
  20. Bruce

    Chants everywhere

    Yep, chanterelles kinda got a late start but are now doing pretty well. I got about 5 pounds on a hike in a state forest last week. I probably could have collected 10x that, but I didn't want to tote them around for six miles. Besides, sometimes "enough is enough." Meadow mushrooms are also starting to pop up. Here's a photo of what I collected a half-hour ago from my own front yard. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hlqa4fMefi1IJjOnwG-obzYdk_CWlt7V/view?usp=sharing Regards, Bruce
  21. Hoosierfunguy

    Chants everywhere

    I haven't gone out much but one day in the woods I did harvest a lot of them in a short amount of time because they are so abundant.
  22. Hoosierfunguy

    Help Identify

    What Bruce said. Early in my mushroom identifying days, I falsely Identified a Green Spore Lepiota as a Parasol. I was sick for 2 days and wished it was a lethal one that would just get it over with because it was so extremely painful. It's also called "The Vomiter" 🤷‍♂️ If you don't have a glass slide for the spores to drop on, a spore print is good to take on a split surface, like half black paper, half white paper to see the color.
  23. dmitch24

    Chants everywhere

    Pounds and pounds of chanterelles this year. Anyone else finding them?
  24. Earlier
  25. JessicaM

    Help Identify

    Bruce, Thank you for your reply. I am not from Indiana, I live in Kentucky. I tried to find my local Mycological Association or similar and couldn't find any, figured Indiana was my best bet. At any rate, I attached a pic with the spore print. I'm not sure I did it right (first time). I put 2 pieces on white paper it's been sitting since 10;46am yesterday 7/29, as you can see the color of the "print" is like a tan-ish color. The sun isn't up fully yet so I can't see it in sunlight. I have little to no knowledge of mushrooms.
  26. Bruce

    Help Identify

    Boy, that sure looks like a green-spored lepiota to me. If the spore print was not green, what color was it? Parasols are not common in Indiana. They also are difficult to identify for certain, and are not an entry-level mushroom. I doubt that this one is a true parasol, as it lacks the variegated stem. But it could be. Get some reference books, and work from there. I highly recommend this one for starters. You should start with oysters and chanterelles and chicken-of-the-woods and stuff like that. Counting on others to identify mushrooms for you is risky. If YOU are not sure, don't eat it. Hope this helps, Bruce
  27. JessicaM

    Help Identify

    We have several different types of mushrooms that are growing in our yard at work. I wanted to know 100% if this mushroom is edible. I think it is a parasol mushroom, I did a spore check and it didn't show up green. However, I'm still leary of it being edible. Thank you for any help you might provide. Thanks!
  28. Bruce

    mulch mushrooms

    We cannot even begin to ID something for you without looking at it. I will say that "umbrella out with tiny bumps and scales" does not sound very much like a puffball. Regards, Bruce
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