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  1. Today
  2. Yesterday
  3. Dhuntington

    Todays finds

    Hope you get some soon. Also hope we get more, need it bad
  4. Bruce

    Todays finds

    I went hunting today for a few hours and found little to nothing; one cluster of honeys that I chose to leave behind. We could use some of that rain you guys up north are getting.
  5. Last week
  6. Dhuntington

    Todays finds

    Sorry alread been ate. There are more out there plan on going out again next friday
  7. Bruce

    Todays finds

    Mmm. Gotta get me some of those Hericiums!
  8. Dhuntington

    Todays finds

    Good day in the woods
  9. Chris Christensen

    ID help

    Compare to Picipes badius, the black footed polypore. A good under shot would help me here, not sure
  10. RalphL

    ID help

    Please identify. Thank you!
  11. eclectickey

    ID Help

    Chris, thanks for looking into it a bit more! I am in Indiana and these were actually found in Lafayette.
  12. eclectickey

    Common Puffballs

    Chris, that sounds delicious! Thanks for the tip! I will have to try to make them up like that.
  13. Chris Christensen

    Common Puffballs

    They are fine, I understand, but I have only eaten Calvatia gigantia. And I slice off the skin. And do an egg batter, then fry them in butter. Next morning I take the leftovers that were cooked up and reheat in the microwave. Add butter and syrup. Best French toast ever, and healthier. Half inch to 3/4 in. Slices.
  14. Chris Christensen

    ID Help

    Idk, but I did a search and I came up with a good match which was Agaricus hondensis. The felt ringed Agaricus. If it is and your in Indiana, Steve Russell may be interested in this collection.
  15. Chris Christensen

    Id help

    Most likely ringless honey mushroom. Should have white spore print. Good edible.
  16. eclectickey

    ID Help

    Anybody know what this mushroom is? I’m guessing something in the genus of Agaricus but I’m not for certain. It’s beautiful, with that gorgeous long veil. I found them everywhere today and was intrigued!
  17. eclectickey

    Common Puffballs

    Hi all! This is my first post. I found some common puffballs (Lycoperdon perlatum) today. Going to cut them in half soon to make sure they are solid white before trying them. Does anyone else here like to eat these?
  18. dmitch24

    Id help

    This year my woods are full of these clumps of mushrooms. I believe them to be the ringless honey mushroom. I spore printed them and had all white spores. Just looking for more information from other people more versed so any information would be greatly appreciated.
  19. Earlier
  20. Good advice, I appreciate it. I was gutsy out in the woods, then got home and decided I wasn't as brave as I thought. I kept and ate plenty of chanterelles which are easy to identify. I need to do another foray to get some more knowledge.
  21. Chris Christensen

    Id help

    Maybe Suade Bolete, Xerocomus subtomentosus?
  22. Dhuntington

    Id help

    Found growing under cedars. Mild taste pungent but not unpleasent smell. Pores stained blue instantly flesh took 5 min or so. Blueing on flesh went away after 15 to 20 min.
  23. Mush Morrow

    Mush Morrow

    Chentrella's picked yesterday in Southern Indiana, our 1st time eating ,they were delicious!
  24. Mush Morrow

    0623190942.jpg

    Edible?
  25. You can tell Chlorophyllum molybdites by its green spore print. The print of a true parasol mushroom is white. Parasols can be difficult to identify. Some species of Amanita have a similar appearance. Although I believe I have found them on several occasions, I've never had the nerve to take them home and eat them. Bruce
  26. Bruce

    Fun day, lots of mushrooms

    I'm seeing brick-cap, bitter and lilac boletes in your mix. Not sure how I feel about "picking mushrooms for fun." I only take what I plan to eat, and even then I leave some behind. Take photos, not mushrooms. Bruce
  27. Great topic. I started my mycology adventure using the ASFGNAWM also. Early in my identification years, I came across what I thought were parasol mushrooms. If I remember correctly,, the field guide mentioned that the toxic lookalike was uncommon and could be positively identified by the spores under a microscope. I didn't have a microscope, so I played the odds. That was a HUGE MISTAKE! I honestly thought I was going to die. The vomiting was indeed violent and frequent. It lasted for three full days and dehydrated me, took all my energy and I felt like I was only moments away form becoming corpse finder matter. With the naked eye, I really don't think there's enough differences between the two, to positively identify, but the book does describe the spore shapes which distinguish the difference. I'm only going by memory, so I might be mistaken in a point, but I will never forget what I went through. The lookalike is toxic enough to become fatal. No mushroom is worth that risk. That's why I have become a proponent of 100% positive identification before SAMPLING a new mushroom.
  28. What are some of the distinguishing features of an edible parasol (Lepiota procera) mushroom VS a highly toxic (Chlorophyllum molybdites) false parasol? In my front yard these large beautiful mushrooms grow. I've looked them up in Audubon Society Field Guide of North American Mushrooms. It seems I have features of both on these mushrooms I pick. For instance, they have a smooth stem, when cut across stem, it turns an immediate brownish color. It has a moveable veil on the stem. Its gills are a close smooth (not woolly) white color that does not bruise when smashed or cut. There is no greenish tint to the gills They seem to remain white. It has its characteristic warted scaled cap brownish knobbed at center with cracking appearance. The guide says parasols are choice edible by experienced mushroom hunters . Other gives violent upset vomiting. Id like to eat these if a true parasol. Any help appreciated.
  29. Not eating any of these, just picked for fun. Not sure what the black bolete looking one is.
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